Feb
21
2017

Comparison Car Rental Websites

The World Wide Web, or internet, is by far the most revolutionary invention mankind has come up with. There is an unlimited amount of information available to us with just a few key strokes. Car hire is included in this. We can now compare rates from the major car hire companies instantly. The good thing about this is that the companies are aware that clients can check. This keeps them more competitive and we reap the benefits with cheaper car hire.

With the internet however it does reduce our power to bargain with the companies as they already have the cheaper rates on the website. So the bargaining is already done and it doesn’t matter if you have a provider you prefer. You can still use the internet to get the best price from that branch, if it is more convenient. Whatever the reason, this extra information is good for us.

You can now find the best deals on car hire where ever you are in the world by using a comparison site. No need to spend your valuable time looking for local car operators numbers and spending hours on the phone talking sometimes to someone who may not speak your language. A comparison site will use software that taps into the National Companies live systems and will display the available cars and prices for you to choose from. Bottom line is that you will save money and time.

These comparison sites are ever evolving, working to make the process of booking car hire as streamlined as possible. The site will be easy to navigate providing all the information you need to complete the booking as well as offer you the ability to select any optional extras that may be required during your car rental. These may include Satellite Navigation (GPS), baby seats, additional driver and excess reduction, reducing your liability in the event of any accident. All the information is available at your fingertips, so be sure to read the Terms and Conditions applicable to the car you are planning to hire.

The global economic climate has not stopped travelers from taking their scheduled holidays. Some travelers are shortening the holiday, but overall with the airlines competing with cheap airfares people are still moving around and enjoying travel. You may find car hire rates a little cheaper due to competition and by far the best place to shop is on line for the best deals. Book early for car hire. Don’t expect to show up at a popular airport and get a bargain. You’re there, you need a car, they have the car and you will need to have the money and drivers license. So it will not be cheap. Book well before leaving home and have your confirmation with you on arrival. Remember if you are traveling during peak seasons, you will pay more for car hire, and everything else for that matter. See you somewhere in the great outdoors. Save travels everyone!

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Feb
21
2017

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it’s jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower’s loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

“As-is”: A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker’s market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker’s opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker’s tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer’s property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry’s national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association’s expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer’s agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage’s listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower’s credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower’s credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential li
sting.

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer’s good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client’s reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner’s insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other’s listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee’s property stating that property is being sold “as is.” All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer’s duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent’s agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower’s loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower’s lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer’s funds and the borrower’s loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer’s loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company’s contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank’s funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority’s tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrowe
r must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer’s agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer’s needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller’s agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower’s monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker’s license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer’s agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW’s (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

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Feb
21
2017

This Holiday Season Visit the Most Popular Cities of Australia

Here is the list of some of the most popular and most interesting cities of Australia to visit; these cities are very beautiful and attractive. If you’re planning to visit Australia, then make advance planning to visit these cities and make your trip a part of your unforgettable memories.

Adelaide: Located between the beautiful white sand beaches and splendid Uncategorized scenes, this city provides you the most beautiful scenery to enjoy. Adelaide is the city to be enjoyed just by a walk. It hosts the finest cultural events and boutique wines that Australia offers.

Darwin: Darwin is Australia’s most popular city named after famous scientist Charles Darwin. Darwin is the entry point to the world famous Kakadu national Park, the dramatic Katherine gorge, the gorgeous Litchfield National park and the red crags of the Kimberly region. Thus, Darwin car hire is proper transport option which can be used enjoy the wild life here and surrounding areas of Darwin.

Melbourne: Located on the magnificent port Philip Bay, this is a vibrant cosmopolitan city. It is the state capital and cultural heart of Victoria. Many different communities have made their home here. Thus, you can find different cultures along with varied cuisines to enjoy. It is a place to relax in beautiful gardens, explore the underwater world and do visit a zoo.

Perth: Perth is totally isolated from Sydney and Melbourne. But still it offers the most interesting tourist attractions with its extravagant beaches. Extravagant beaches round off a city that’s largely shaken off its image as a boring backwater to emerge as a vivacious and culturally significant Australian destination. Near by Rottnest Island can be easily visited by Perth car hire which is famous for penguins and quokka bird.

Cairns: Cairns is the gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, one of the world’s most popular diving sites. It is a bustling tourist centre with countless excursions to Daintree Rainforest departing daily. No beach exists here; but still people come here to enjoy the man-made lagoon on the Esplanade. It is surrounded by pleasant grassy areas perfect for relaxing under the sun.

Brisbane: Brisbane is the vibrant capital of Queensland. Situated along the Brisbane River, the city is a true mixture of old and new culture. There are many older heritage buildings surrounded by modern monuments. There’s an abundance of green spaces to walk around and enjoy the pleasant sun. There are numerous outdoor activities going on round the year to participate.

Sydney: Vast, vibrant and dynamic sun baked beaches offer this strewn metropolis. Sydney is the epitome of easy going happy life. World-class cuisine, cutting edge street culture, sport, and fashion makes it the world’s top cities to live in. The Harbour Bridge, opera house and Bondi beach are the main attractions of Sydney never to miss destinations on your trip.

These are the top cities of Australia that offer you the best tourist attractions. This Christmas, arrange your tour to these cities for enjoying your holidays. In advance, make all the preparations in order to make your trip pleasurable and comfortable. If you are planning to make a trip to these destinations, then book tickets for flight, hire car services and make accommodations in advance so as not to end up in a last minute rush. You can even hire a car to go around these cities to explore the local attractions.

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Feb
20
2017

Everything About Payday Loans

The statement that a payday loan will be your sheet anchor when you desperately require cash is rather sketchy. They, without any doubt, have got their very own positive factors. Nonetheless there are actually many disadvantages to this type of financial loans. I personally try to step back from this form of lending services. Nonetheless let us evaluate pretty much all advantages and drawbacks of these loans to create an objective view on this credit service.

In actual fact, payday loans are money advances. When you get caught up in between your pay days with no money in your purse, you desperately require some funds from an outside source. Moreover if you are faced with various unpredicted expenses, you have got very poor credit rating, and credit cards aren’t any option for you, a payday loan is what exactly will be able to assist you to make it through until you obtain your next paycheck.

Dealing with such kind of financing is merely like dealing with pretty much any other loan. You simply borrow a certain amount of cash with a commitment to return it back at the pre-agreed fee and rate.

Payday Loans Costs

Different creditors sanction loans at various fees and rates. And this particular problem actually is a drawback of these loans. You will often shell out from $ 15 – $ 30 for receiving $ 100. In terms of interest you would require to pay, it’s really drop-dead enormous. The interest rates range in between 390% and 780%. And this is really the worst part with regard to these loans. Let’s now proceed to the more pleasant aspects.

Applying for a Payday Loan

The procedure for payday loans application is very simple. You can execute it on the Web, or go to a loan office. You complete a loan application and give a few personal details for a loan provider to make a loan decision. The requirements are usually pretty much the same: you have to be at least 18 or above, need to have a stable employment with a minimum monthly income of $ 1,000, and also a checking bank account. You will, quite possibly, be asked to give your social security number, copies of bank accounts and pay stubs. In case you fulfill all the specifications, you can be positive that you would be approved for a loan. Thereafter you normally have got to hang around for 24 hours (or less in some instances) and you will have the access to your cash.

Payday Loans Positives and Negatives

Payday loans really are a solution for cash-strapped individuals. In the event that you desperately want to get hold of some cash and you need the same fast, using a payday loan is certainly much better than stealing a bank. Another nice thing with regard to such sort of loans is that by getting one you do not expose yourself to a long term obligation, such as whenever managing a typical bank (when you get a mortgage, a car loan, or a reward charge card). You’ve got to pay back the money borrowed soon after you receive your next paycheck. Usually, the ceiling on the highest possible sum of money you can borrow is $ 2,500. Therefore, this is one more advantage of such loans. You just won’t bury yourself in big debts. And payday loans end up being significantly less expensive as compared to bounced checks.

So, when you have a heap of bills to pay one day and no credit line or cash available for doing it, consider getting a payday loan. It is usually a good backup strategy for you. However be responsible with respect to paying it off on time, otherwise, you will encounter big charges and might get the sticky end of the stick. Recollect payday loans primarily in some cases of unexpected emergency, not whenever you feel like purchasing a new designer’s suit or jewelry.

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Feb
20
2017

Commercial Real Estate Agents – Let the Tenants Give You Some Local Leads and Contacts

When you work as a salesperson or agent in commercial property sales and leasing, you should always be on the hunt for opportunity and listings. Given that the commercial and retail property market revolves around businesses, the key to creating listing and enquiry ‘churn’ is in keeping in contact with business owners and tenants.

So you ask them questions. You need to know what they are looking for in premises when and if the time comes to move, the time that they will be getting to the end of their current lease, and what budget they may have in making a change.

It is also interesting to note that many tenants will tell you about the local area and the other nearby businesses. Given that they know their area so well, they are likely to read the change and pressures of the area better than you do.

This tenant contact process takes a systemised approach and requires meaningful content that the tenants value each time they talk to you. In most cases that will be something like the following:

1. A list of vacant premises in the local area that match the industry type for the tenant

2. Details of recent asking rentals and achieved rents from new leases, and also the rents from existing lease relationships (renewals)

3. Details of new property developments that will impact the supply and demand for business premises

4. Comparable property detail in the local area. This will include area, proximity, and improvements.

5. Movements of other major businesses or competitors coming and going through the precinct

6. Prices of property in the local area given the usage and improvements.

7. Levels of incentives being offered to new tenants in the current market

In giving a tenant this helpful information about the local area, the exchange of information you require and seek back from them is quite simple and takes the following form:

1. Who is moving in the local area?

2. What businesses are under pressures of space or relocation?

3. What or who is the landlord for the property and how can they be contacted?

4. When will you need to look for the alternatives of relocation?

5. When will your lease come up for review?

6. What are the neighbouring tenants like and who runs the business?

Asking these questions will give you so much information to build your ongoing prospecting and cold calling model around. Making the fullest use of the local information that abounds is just so simple if you ask the questions and make it part of your meetings and connections with clients or prospects. Every business person knows someone that occupies or owns a commercial property; get the names and build on the facts.

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